Software Documentation

Flame systemsDocumentation

Intermediate Last updated: July 16, 2019

4 Galaxis G-Flame

The Galaxis G-Flame unit is a vertical flame projector that can be controlled by the Galaxis ignition system, or by any of the DMX-capable firing systems, such as Piroshow, Pyromac, PyroSure, and FireTek.

 

Figure 1 – Galaxis G-Flame

 

If the flame unit is controlled by the Galaxis ignition system, the “GS2” script file contains flame triggers in the same format as the pyro ignition triggers, and intermixed with the pyro ignition triggers.  In the GS2 file representation (details here), each trigger row represents the flame unit as a module number, and the triggered flame effect as the pin number.  The pin number just starts at one and counts up, incrementing for each shot.  The GS2 file contains a duration field that get passed to the controller, so effects can have arbitrary durations.  The half dozen or so example G-Flame effects in the Generic Effects provide some reasonable options, but you are free to create your own G-Flame effects with whatever durations you want, following the instructions below.

If the flame unit is controlled by DMX , the DMX signal turns on and off the flame units by writing an “on” value or “off” value to the DMX channel allocated to the G-Flame unit.  Additionally, the DMX script contains a safety channel that can be shared across G-Flame units in the same DMX universe.  The purpose of the safety channel is to reduce the chance of a spurious ignition or held-over ignition by requiring that both the flame unit is “on” and also the safety channel is “on” in order for the flame to operate.  When you design a show in Finale 3D for G-Flame units, you add safety channel “effects” to the show and adjust their durations to cover the periods for which you want the G-Flame units to be armed.  Notwithstanding the use of safety channels to arm the G-Flame units, errors in DMX signals are still possible.  Galaxis cautions that flame units are inherently dangerous to operate over DMX, and that users operate them at their own risk.

For further information about the G-Flame units, see the Galaxis website (www.firing-system.com) and the User Manual.

 

Instructions for designing G-Flame shows controlled by the Galaxis ignition system

To design a show for Galaxis G-Flame units, please follow these steps:

  1. Set up.  (A) Follow the flame set up instructions in the Flame systems basic instructions and Exporting a firing system script for flame systems.  (B) Make sure your flame positions are configured with the G-Flame module types (GALAXIS v2.6 G-Flame w/Steppers, GALAXIS v2.6 G-Flame No Steppers, GALAXIS v2.4 G-Flame w/Steppers, or GALAXIS v2.4 G-Flame w/Steppers) and make sure the version number and use of steppers is consistent with any pyro module types used in the show, because you cannot mix-and-match version numbers or the user of steppers. (C) Set the “Start Module” of each flame position to a distinct module number that will not conflict with the module numbers used by any pyro positions.  When controlled by the Galaxis ignition system, each G-Flame unit operates as an independent module, with its own module number; its “pins” represent the flame shots, counting up incrementally.
  2. Browse flame effects.  (A) In the effects palette, select the Generic Effects collection at the bottom of the palette, and select the “other” filter icon at the top (the icon looks #?!*).  Type “g-flame” in the search box.  That will filter the effect palette to show only the G-Flame effects, of which there are about a half dozen, beginning with part number GFX9800.
  3. Insert flame effects.  Click on the G-Flame effect icons in the effects palette (or equivalently in the effects window) to insert them into the show.  After inserting them into the show you can select groups of any the G-Flame effects and do functions like “Sequence” to make interesting timing patterns, just like scripting for pyro.
  4. Make your own, or modify existing flame effects.  The G-Flame effects come in a few example durations in the Generic Effects collection, but you can also create your own variations that have arbitrary durations.  (A) First copy the original effect by selecting the effect row in Generic Effects, then right-click copy (or control-C).  (B) Then paste into your My Effects or any of your other effects collections.  (C) After copying it to your own inventory, you can modify its parameters.  Simply edit the duration field to change its duration.  The 3D simulation and exported GS2 file will automatically incorporate your change.  You can also adjust the height field to change the height of the flame simulation, though doing so has no bearing on the exported GS2 script.

 

Instructions for designing G-Flame shows controlled by DMX

To design a show for Galaxis G-Flame units, please follow these steps:

  1.  Set up.  (A) Follow the flame set up instructions in the Flame systems basic instructions and Exporting a firing system script for flame systems.  Depending on your DMX controller, you may choose to give each G-Flame unit its own DMX universe, or give each G-Flame unit a channel in a shared DMX universe (the G-Flame units require only a single channel).   Assuming you are giving each G-Flame unit a channel in a shared DMX universe, then: (B) In the real world configure each physical G-Flame unit’s “Start Address” to be the DMX channel you allocate for the flame unit.  (C) In Finale 3D configure the “DMX Channel Base” of the flame unit’s position to be the Start Address minus one (don’t forget to subtract one!). (D) In the real world, configure each physical G-Flame unit’s “Safety Channel Address” to be the DMX channel you allocate for the shared safety channel.  (E)  In Finale 3D configure the “DMX Channel Base” of the safety position to be the Safety Channel Address minus one (don’t forget to subtract one!).
  2. Browse flame effects.  (A) In the effects palette, select the Generic Effects collection at the bottom of the palette, and select the “other” filter icon at the top (the icon looks #?!*).  Type “g-flame” in the search box.  That will filter the effect palette to show only the G-Flame effects, of which there are about a half dozen, beginning with part number GFX9800. (B)  You will also need the “G-Flame DMX Safety Channel” effect (GFX9899).  The “G-Flame DMX Safety Channel” has the correct DMX value in its DMX Patch to arm the flame unit (value = 178, though any value in the range 153 to 204 would work).  The DMX value is different from the generic safety channel effect (GFX9900), which does not work with the G-Flame unit because it writes a value 255, which is not in the range 153 to 204.
  3. Insert flame effects.  Click on the G-Flame effect icons in the effects palette (or equivalently in the effects window) to insert them into the show.  After inserting them into the show you can select groups of any the G-Flame effects and do functions like “Sequence” to make interesting timing patterns, just like scripting for pyro.
  4. Make your own, or modify existing flame effects.  The G-Flame effects come in a few example durations in the Generic Effects collection, but you can also create your own variations that have arbitrary durations.  (A) First copy the original effect by selecting the effect row in Generic Effects, then right-click copy (or control-C).  (B) Then paste into your My Effects or any of your other effects collections.  (C) After copying it to your own inventory, you can modify its parameters.  Simply edit the duration field to change its duration.  The 3D simulation and the DMX Patch will automatically incorporate your change.  You can also adjust the height field to change the height of the flame simulation, though doing so has no bearing on the exported DMX script.
  5. Add safety channel effects.  Following the instructions Exporting a firing system script for flame systems add “G-Flame DMX Safety Channel” effects to your safety channel position, and adjust their durations to cover the spans of time for which you want to arm the flame unit.

 

G-Flame example

The example files in Table 1 include G-Flame show files configured for the Galaxis ignition system, and for DMX using the FireTEK ignition system (see FireTEK). Exported GS2 and CSV files for the two firing systems, respectively, are also available for download in the table. The example show includes both G-Flame and pyro, to illustrate shows that combine both types of effects, and in the case of the FireTEK example combine DMX and and pyro ignitions. The setup between the Galaxis and DMX shows are notably different, as follows from the instructions at the top of this page. In the Galaxis ignition system show, each G-Flame unit is its own module; no safety channels are required; and no DMX settings like DMX Base Channel are required in the positions. In the DMX example, the G-Flame units are configured for different channels in the same, shared DMX universe. All G-Flame units in the DMX example are served by the same FireTEK module. The show has a single safety channel position, with a safety channel address of 1 (i.e., the DMX Base Channel for the position is 0; and the channel offset in the safety channel effect’s DMX Patch is 1). If you open the example files and look at the positions window (“Window > Position window” menu item), you can see the configurations of all the positions in one place.

 

Table 1 – Example files

Download link Explanation
g_flame_galaxis_standard.fin Show file for G-Flame and pyro example with Galaxis ignition system
g_flame_galaxis_standard.gs2 Exported GS2 file for G-Flame and pyro example with Galaxis ignition system
g_flame_firetek_standard.fin Show file for G-Flame and pyro example with FireTEK ignition system by DMX
g_flame_firetek_standard.csv Exported CSV file for G-Flame and pyro example with FireTEK ignition system by DMX